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Open MRI Scan (For Claustrophobia) – Greenville, SC

Open MRI Scan (For Claustrophobia) – Greenville, SC

$649.75

Average Prices Start at $1200. You Save $600
Certified imaging technicians and physicians in greenville SC take open MRI scans provide your physician with valuable information for monitoring, diagnosis and treatment of a variety of diseases and conditions.
How Online MRI Purchases Work

  • Voucher – After purchase, you’ll receive a service voucher with location and contact info for the provider
  • Doctor’s Order – Securely upload a picture of your doctor’s order to the secure online server provided in the voucher email.
  • Schedule – The provider will call to schedule your MRI in less than 24 hours.

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Description

  1. We will send you a voucher for the service you purchased that includes details like location and contact info for the provider.
  2. We will request that you send us a picture or copy of your doctor order. You cannot get a MRI scan without a doctor’s order.
  3. The provider will call you to schedule the scan and answer any questions you have about the scan.
  4. Please note, ALL OPEN MRI’S ARE WITHOUT CONTRAST AND HAVE LOWER IMAGING POWER THAN TRADITIONAL MRI. (If you would like a traditional, higher power MRI, conscious sedation is used for an additional cost. Contact Us for details.)
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Open MRI Scan (For Claustrophobia) – Greenville, SC

Certified imaging technicians and physicians take MRI scans provide your physician with valuable information for monitoring, diagnosis and treatment of a variety of diseases and conditions.

What is an MRI Scan?

Photo of an MRI machine

MRI is a non-invasive imaging technology that produces three dimensional detailed anatomical images. It is often used for disease detection, diagnosis, and treatment monitoring. It is based on sophisticated technology that excites and detects the change in the direction of the rotational axis of protons found in the water that makes up living tissues.

How does MRI work?
MRI of a knee
MRI of a knee

MRIs employ powerful magnets which produce a strong magnetic field that forces protons in the body to align with that field. When a radiofrequency current is then pulsed through the patient, the protons are stimulated, and spin out of equilibrium, straining against the pull of the magnetic field. When the radiofrequency field is turned off, the MRI sensors are able to detect the energy released as the protons realign with the magnetic field. The time it takes for the protons to realign with the magnetic field, as well as the amount of energy released, changes depending on the environment and the chemical nature of the molecules. Physicians are able to tell the difference between various types of tissues based on these magnetic properties.

To obtain an MRI image, a patient is placed inside a large magnet and must remain very still during the imaging process in order not to blur the image. Contrast agents (often containing the element Gadolinium) may be given to a patient intravenously before or during the MRI to increase the speed at which protons realign with the magnetic field. The faster the protons realign, the brighter the image.

What is an Open MRI Scan?

An open MRI is a MRI machine designed for people who cannot use a standard MRI machine, like patients with claustrophobia.
Photo of an open MRI machine
New open MRI machine
  • Claustrophobia—people with even mild claustrophobia may find it difficult to tolerate long scan times inside the machine. Familiarization with the machine and process, as well as visualization techniques, sedation, and anesthesia provide patients with mechanisms to overcome their discomfort. Additional coping mechanisms include listening to music or watching a video or movie, closing or covering the eyes, and holding a panic button. The open MRI is a machine that is open on the sides rather than a tube closed at one end, so it does not fully surround the patient. It was developed to accommodate the needs of patients who are uncomfortable with the narrow tunnel and noises of the traditional MRI and for patients whose size or weight make the traditional MRI impractical. Newer open MRI technology provides high quality images for many but not all types of examinations.

Why Get an MRI Scan?

What is MRI used for?

MRI scanners are particularly well suited to image the non-bony parts or soft tissues of the body. They differ from computed tomography (CT), in that they do not use the damaging ionizing radiation of x-rays. The brain, spinal cord and nerves, as well as muscles, ligaments, and tendons are seen much more clearly with MRI than with regular x-rays and CT; for this reason MRI is often used to image knee and shoulder injuries.

In the brain, MRI can differentiate between white matter and grey matter and can also be used to diagnose aneurysms and tumors. Because MRI does not use x-rays or other radiation, it is the imaging modality of choice when frequent imaging is required for diagnosis or therapy, especially in the brain. However, MRI is more expensive than x-ray imaging or CT scanning.

One kind of specialized MRI is functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI.) This is used to observe brain structures and determine which areas of the brain “activate” (consume more oxygen) during various cognitive tasks. It is used to advance the understanding of brain organization and offers a potential new standard for assessing neurological status and neurosurgical risk.

Certified & Experienced Doctors

Certified MRI images to provide your physician with valuable information

State Of The Art Equipment & Processes

Our providers use only the best equipment and ensure the quality of the procedures is exactly what is needed.

Reduce Out Of Pocket Expenses

With the uMedMarket method, out of pocket expenses are kept to a minimum, allowing you to save more and not over pay!

Need Help Or Have Questions?

Call Us: (864) 436-7447 Email Us: Contact@uMedMarket.com

Are there risks?

Although MRI does not emit the ionizing radiation that is found in x-ray and CT imaging, it does employ a strong magnetic field. The magnetic field extends beyond the machine and exerts very powerful forces on objects of iron, some steels, and other magnetizable objects; it is strong enough to fling a wheelchair across the room. Patients should notify their physicians of any form of medical or implant prior to an MR scan.

MRI image of the upper body and head of a person

When having an MRI scan, the following should be taken into consideration:

  • People with implants, particularly those containing iron, — pacemakers, vagus nerve stimulators, implantable cardioverter- defibrillators, loop recorders, insulin pumps, cochlear implants, deep brain stimulators, and capsules from capsule endoscopy should not enter an MRI machine.
  • Noise—loud noise commonly referred to as clicking and beeping, as well as sound intensity up to 120 decibels in certain MR scanners, may require special ear protection.
  • Nerve Stimulation—a twitching sensation sometimes results from the rapidly switched fields in the MRI.
  • Contrast agents—patients with severe renal failure who require dialysis may risk a rare but serious illness called nephrogenic systemic fibrosis that may be linked to the use of certain gadolinium-containing agents, such as gadodiamide and others. Although a causal link has not been established, current guidelines in the United States recommend that dialysis patients should only receive gadolinium agents when essential, and that dialysis should be performed as soon as possible after the scan to remove the agent from the body promptly.
  • Pregnancy—while no effects have been demonstrated on the fetus, it is recommended that MRI scans be avoided as a precaution especially in the first trimester of pregnancy when the fetus’ organs are being formed and contrast agents, if used, could enter the fetal bloodstream.

Depending on which part of your body is being scanned, you may be asked to:

  • Take off some or all of your clothing and wear a hospital gown
  • Remove metal objects, such as a belt, jewelry, dentures and eyeglasses, which might interfere with image results
  • Refrain from eating or drinking for a few hours before your scan

Contrast material

A special dye called contrast material is needed for some MRI scans to help highlight the areas of your body being examined. The contrast material can help highlight certain structures in your body.

Contrast material might be given to you:

  • By mouth. If your esophagus or stomach is being scanned, you may need to swallow a liquid that contains contrast material. This drink may taste unpleasant.
  • By injection. Contrast agents can be injected through a vein in your arm to help your gallbladder, urinary tract, liver or blood vessels stand out on the images. You may experience a feeling of warmth during the injection or a metallic taste in your mouth.
  • By enema. A contrast material may be inserted in your rectum to help visualize your intestines. This procedure can make you feel bloated and uncomfortable.

Preparing your child for a scan

If your infant or toddler is having a MRI scan, the doctor may recommend a sedative to keep your child calm and still. Movement blurs the images and may lead to inaccurate results. Ask your doctor how to prepare your child.

You can have a MRI scan done in a hospital or an outpatient facility. MRI scans are painless and, with newer machines, take only a few minutes. The whole procedure typically takes about 30-60 minutes.

During the procedure

MRI scanners are shaped like a large doughnut standing on its side. You lie on a narrow, motorized table that slides through the opening into a tunnel. Straps and pillows may be used to help you stay in position. During a head scan, the table may be fitted with a special cradle that holds your head still.

While the table moves you into the scanner, detectors and magnets rotate around you. Each rotation yields several images of thin slices of your body. You may hear buzzing and whirring noises.

A technologist in a separate room can see and hear you. You will be able to communicate with the technologist via intercom. The technologist may ask you to hold your breath at certain points to avoid blurring the images.

After the procedure

After the exam you can return to your normal routine. If you were given contrast material, you may receive special instructions. In some cases, you may be asked to wait for a short time before leaving to ensure that you feel well after the exam. After the scan, you’ll likely be told to drink lots of fluids to help your kidneys remove the contrast material from your body.